U.S. envoy Kerry says China is key to tackling the climate crisis: the NPR


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In this photo submitted by the State Department, the United States Special Envoy for Climate Change John Kerry attends a meeting with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi via video link in Tianjin, China, on Wednesday, September 1, 2021. Wang warned Kerry on Wednesday that the deterioration of US-China relations could disrupt cooperation between the two on climate change.

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In this photo provided by the State Department, US Presidential Special Envoy for Climate Change John Kerry attends a meeting with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi via video link in Tianjin, China, on Wednesday, September 1, 2021. Wang warned Kerry on Wednesday that the deterioration of US-China relations could disrupt cooperation between the two on climate change.

AP

BEIJING – China must expand its efforts to reduce carbon emissions to prevent global temperatures from rising, U.S. envoy John Kerry said on Thursday.

The State Department said Kerry told Chinese Deputy Prime Minister Han Zheng at a virtual meeting that “there is no way” for the world to resolve the climate crisis without “China’s full commitment and commitment.”

China is the world’s largest emitter of carbon and produces approximately 27% of global greenhouse gases, followed by the United States.

Kerry is in the eastern Chinese port city of Tianjin to discuss stronger efforts to limit the temperature rise to a maximum of 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) from pre-industrial levels.

Efforts on global decarbonisation will come under the spotlight at a UN conference to be held in Glasgow, Scotland, in late November, known as COP26.

“Secretary Kerry stressed the importance of the world taking serious climate action in this critical decade and strengthening global climate ambitions,” the State Department said in a statement.

The official Chinese news agency Xinhua quoted Han as saying to Kerry that China had made “great efforts” in the fight against climate change and had achieved “outstanding results”.

“China hopes that the American side will create appropriate circumstances for joint resolution of climate change based on the spirit of talks between their leaders,” Han reported, Xinhua reports.

Kerry stopped in Japan on Tuesday to discuss climate issues with Japanese officials before heading to China.

On Wednesday, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi warned Kerry that deteriorating U.S.-Chinese relations could undermine co-operation between the two over climate change.

Such cooperation cannot be separated from the wider relationship, Wang Kerry told via video link.

Relations between Washington and Beijing have been strained by disputes over trade, technology and human rights. However, the two sides identified the climate crisis as an area of ​​possible co-operation following U.S. President Joe Biden’s decision to rejoin the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement.

China gets about 60% of its energy from coal and is opening more and more coal-fired power plants, while committing to reducing the use of fossil fuels.

Beijing has cited historic U.S. emissions as a reason to resist action as it thrives on solar and other renewable energy sources. The country has set a goal of generating 20% ​​of its total renewable energy needs by 2025, becoming carbon neutral by 2060 and reducing total emissions starting in 2030.

Biden announced a target of reducing US greenhouse gas emissions by up to 52% by 2030 – twice the target set by then-President Barack Obama in the Paris Agreement. The goal by 2030 ranks the United States at the very top of countries in terms of climate ambitions.


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